Thursday, 29 June 2017

Spotlight: Indigenous Culture @ the Library


As part of our Indigenous Collection Spotlight series and in recognition of #NAIDOC Week 2017 we are featuring key e-resources from our Library’s collection on Indigenous Culture. 

NAIDOC Week (2-9 July) is a celebration of the history, culture and achievements of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and a time to recognise the contributions Aboriginals and Islanders have made to Australia and our society. Find out how we are celebrating NAIDOC week at RMIT University.

Here are some of the highlights from our Library’s collection on Indigenous Culture:
e-books 

Streaming Videos: The following is a selection of the indigenous streamed videos available to the RMIT community (login required).

e-journals

Databases (log-in required)


In recognition of #NAIDOC Week 2017, RMIT University Library is hosting Indigenous film screenings @ the Library (3-7 July) in Carlton Library Seminar room, screening an eclectic schedule of award-winning Indigenous film.

Film Screening schedule (streamed via EduTV):

Monday 3 July (starting at 6:30 pm) - Bran Nue Dae - Rachel Perkins 2009
Tuesday 4 July (starting at 6:30 pm) - Samson and Delilah - Warwick Thornton 2009
Wednesday 5 July (starting at 6:30 pm) - The Sapphires - Wayne Blair 2012
Thursday 6 July (starting at 6:30 pm) - Ten Canoes - Rolf De Heer 2006
Friday 7 July (starting at 4pm) - Stone Bros - Richard Franklin 2009

Looking for more Indigenous resources @ the Library? Find information on indigenous culture, education, environment, film, health, law, land rights, reconciliation and sport in the Library’s Indigenous Resources subject guide. RMIT University Library is committed to enrich its growing collection of Indigenous resources in support of RMIT's vision for reconciliation,‘promoting a learning and research environment that engages partnerships and values Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander knowledges, cultures and diversity’
RMIT University acknowledges the Wurundjeri people of the Kulin Nations as the traditional owners of the land on which the University stands. RMIT University respectfully recognises Elders both past and present.

Celebrating NAIDOC Week @ the Library

17_NAIDOC_logo_stacked-01.png
NAIDOC Week (2-9 July 2017) is a celebration of the history, culture and achievements of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and a time to recognise the contributions Aboriginals and Islanders have made to Australia and our society.

The 2017 theme Our Languages Matter, aims to celebrate the essential role that Indigenous languages play in cultural identity, linking people to their land and water, and in the communication of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander history, spirituality and rites, through story and song. Find out more at the NAIDOC website.

Activities take place across the nation during NAIDOC Week in July. RMIT University encourages all staff and students to participate in celebrations - t
his year’s highlight is NAIDOC Week @ RMIT Bundoora Campus. The College of SEH hosts a celebratory NAIDOC day on Monday 3 July

And in recognition of #NAIDOC Week 2017, RMIT University Library is -
and 
  • hosting Indigenous film screenings @ the Library (3-7 July) in Carlton Library Seminar room, screening an eclectic schedule of award-winning Indigenous film.

Film Screening schedule (streamed via EduTV):

Monday 3 July (starting at 6:30 pm) - Bran Nue Dae - Rachel Perkins 2009
Tuesday 4 July (starting at 6:30 pm) - Samson and Delilah - Warwick Thornton 2009
Wednesday 5 July (starting at 6:30 pm) - The Sapphires - Wayne Blair 2012
Thursday 6 July (starting at 6:30 pm) - Ten Canoes - Rolf De Heer 2006
Friday 7 July (starting at 4pm) - Stone Bros - Richard Franklin 2009

This is a free event. All welcome. BYO snacks.

To find an event near you visit the NAIDOC events calendarRemember: the education and celebration doesn't have to stop on 9 July.
Looking for Indigenous resources @ the Library? Find information on indigenous culture, education, environment, film, health, law, land rights, reconciliation and sport in the Library’s Indigenous Resources subject guide. RMIT University Library is committed to enrich its growing collection of Indigenous resources in support of RMIT's vision for reconciliation,‘promoting a learning and research environment that engages partnerships and values Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander knowledges, cultures and diversity’.


RMIT University acknowledges the Wurundjeri people of the Kulin Nations as the traditional owners of the land on which the University stands. RMIT University respectfully recognises Elders both past and present.

Wednesday, 28 June 2017

Tuesday, 27 June 2017

Library lovers - don't miss Melbourne Rare Books Week


Book lovers will be fascinated by Melbourne Rare Books Week, to be held between June 30 and July 9, 2017. This yearly event is a major attraction for students, academics, bibliophiles, book collectors and all who have a love of words and literary heritage. Admission to all events is free

If you have a fascination for rare books and manuscripts, it is time you discovered RMIT University Library Special Collection - which houses the oldest book in our Library, an item published in 1664! This philosophical title is, In taciti primordia annalium & historias commentatio [trans. In the first days of secret histories] by Johann Heinrich Boecler.

Another rare publication dates from 1472 and is titled Six rare incunabula manuscript leaves. Written in Latin, this is an exquisite example of the printing techniques of the fifteenth century. 

Other treasures held in the Library Special Collection include a book written in 1664, titled  In taciti primordia annalium & historias commentatio (trans. In the first days of secret histories); a handwritten thesis from 1949Textile design for hand woven and printed fabrics : a thesis prepared for the Art Teachers' Certificate, 1949 and The Banksias, a beautifully illustrated book about Australian wild flowers.

For more information about the Library Special Collection check out our Library guide.


Discover. Learn. Succeed. 


Thursday, 22 June 2017

New Swanston Library entrance open today!

Breaking news - from today Swanston Library has a brand new Library entrance!

You can now enter the Library in two ways - either from Building 10, Level 6 or from Building 10, Level 5 above RMIT Connect. For all of our opening hours visit the Library opening hours page.

The new Library includes some amazing, light and bright study spaces on Level 5 and Level 6 in Building 10 and 12. Here's just some of the inviting spaces available for you.







Monday, 19 June 2017

RMIT authors showcase - Professor Rob Watts


At RMIT University Library we are extremely proud of our academics and the contributions they make to research and innovation in their fields. As part of our showcase of RMIT authors, we are delighted to feature Professor Rob Watts and his latest publication, States of Violence and the Civilising Process: On Criminology and State Crime, from series: Critical Criminological Perspectives, published by Palgrave Macmillan in 2016.

Professor Watts is Professor of Social Policy, in the School of Global, Urban and Social Studies at RMIT University. His interests include policy studies, ethics and good practice, applied human rights and Organisational studies.

In his latest publication, States of Violence and the Civilising Process: On Criminology and State Crime Watts explores a wide range of academic sources and intellectual history to show how state crime in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries has often eluded scrutiny by criminologists and sociologists. He then develops a framework for thinking about crimes of the state that links up a  study of policy and an ethical inquiry into why and how people do bad things to other people.
Find the book in the Library: 
Watts, R. (2016). States of violence and the civilising process : On criminology and state crime. London: Palgrave Macmillan.

New book due for publication later this year:
(June 2017)  Bessant, J., Farthing, R., & Watts, R. (2017) The Precarious Generation: A Political Economy of Young People. Routledge
Other recent publications by Professor Watts, available in the Library include:

Watts, R. (2017). Public universities, managerialism and the value of higher education. London: Palgrave Macmillan (imprint is published by Springer Nature).

Bessant, J., & Watts, R. (2016). Indigenous Digital Art as Politics in Australia. Culture, Theory and Critique, 1-14.

Watts, R, & Mays, J., Marston, G., Tomlinson, J. (2016). Running on empty: Australia's Neoliberal income security system, 1988-2015. Palgrave Macmillan (London, United Kingdom).

Bessant, J, Watts, R, & Lisa Young, Mary Anne Kenny, Geoffrey Monahan. (2016). Children and the law: An historical overview. Lexis Nexis (Chatswood, New South Wales, Australia).

Bessant, J., Farthing, R., & Watts, R. (2015). Co-designing a civics curriculum: Young people, democratic deficit and political renewal in the EU. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 1-19.
For more information about Professor Rob Watts, see his staff profile which includes a more comprehensive biography and list of his publications.

Thursday, 15 June 2017

Discover Gartner @ the Library


In this e-resource profile, RMIT University Library is highlighting Gartner, the leading provider of research and analysis on the use of information technology. Gartner’s extensive database includes research findings on a wide range of IT-related topics, including analyses, opinions, trends, leading practices and case studies. Gartner analysts distil large volumes of data into clear and usable advice for practitioners


All academic and professional staff - Join us at Swanston Library Megaflex room on Thursday 29 June 11-12pm for an introduction to using Gartner Core Research.

Updated daily, you’ll find research and analysis on:

  • Learning Management Systems
  • customer relationship management
  • service platforms
  • strategic technology trends
  • social learning
  • IT in Education
Gartner is applicable to all business, computer science and marketing students. Students in law and finance can benefit from learning about cyber security issues and procurement strategies for technology. Gartner will also appeal to a wide variety of University staff.
Managers and IT staff could use Gartner to:
  • validate technology decisions
  • improve infrastructure
  • analyze industry trends 
  • explore best practices 
  • leverage their vertical focus on education technology 
  • benchmark and assess IT services

Academic staff could use Gartner to:

  • stay current with the rapidly changing IT industry
  • ensure your relevancy in the classroom with fact-based data 
  • enrich your students’ experience with insight into the use of technology and solving business problems 

Please take full advantage of this impressive service. Explore Gartner.


Underground & Independent Comics @ the Library

In this e-resource profile, RMIT University Library is highlighting Underground and Independent Comics, Comix, and Graphic Novels, the first ever scholarly, primary-source database focused on adult comic books and graphic novels.

This database features the works of artists both celebrated and overlooked, alongside interviews, criticism, and journal articles that document the continual growth and evolution of this artform. 

The collection contains 535 comic series, 2,581 comic books totalling 163,263 pages, including the infamous Zippy Stories, no. 1, by Bill Griffith. (San Francisco, CA:Rip Off Press)
Did you know that RMIT University Library has access to hundreds of databases? Start exploring databases through RMIT University Libraries, you never know what you’ll find!

For help with Library services or resources Ask a LibrarianSee you in the Library!


Discover. Learn. Succeed. 




Tuesday, 13 June 2017

RMIT authors showcase - Dr Libby Porter

At RMIT University Library we are extremely proud of our academics and the contributions they make to research and innovation in their fields. As part of our showcase of RMIT authors, we are delighted to feature Dr Libby Porter and her most recent publication,  Planning for coexistence: Recognizing Indigenous rights through land-use planning in Canada and Australia.

Dr Porter is a Vice Chancellor's Principal
Research Fellow
with RMIT's School of Global, Urban and Social Studies.  She is a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy and has held academic appointments in the UK and Australia. Professor Porter, a scholar-activist, has a particular focus on the role of planning and urban development processes in dispossession and displacement. Her work has looked at these questions in a number of different ways including: Indigenous rights in urban planning and natural resource management; cities and diversity; gentrification and displacement; the impact of mega-events on cities; sustainability and urban governance and she has published widely on these areas.
Dr Porter’s interest in Indigenous rights in urban planning and natural resource management is reflected in her latest publication, Planning for coexistence: Recognizing Indigenous rights through land-use planning in Canada and Australia. This book compares the experiences of four Indigenous communities in two distinct settler-colonial states, Victoria, Australia and British Columbia, Canada, who are challenging and renegotiating land-use planning in these places, breaking new ground in our understanding of contemporary Indigenous land justice politics.  In doing so, the book grapples with what it means for planning to engage with Indigenous peoples through a critical examination of planning contact zones in these contrasting environments.  

Find the book in the Library: 
Porter, E., Barry J (2016). Planning for coexistence: Recognizing Indigenous rights through land-use planning in Canada and Australia. Routledge, United Kingdom.

New book due for publication later this year:
Jackson, S, Porter, L and Johnson, L (2017 forthcoming) Planning in Indigenous Australia: From imperial foundations to postcolonial futures, London: Routledge.
Other publications by Dr Porter, include:
Porter, L. (2017) Indigenous people and the miserable failure of planning, In: Planning Practice and Research, Feb 2017 online, 1 - 15
Gray, N.,Porter, L. (2015). By any means necessary: urban regeneration and the "state of exception" in the Commonwealth Games 2014 In: Antipode: A radical journal of geography, 47, 380 - 400
Porter, L. (2010) Unlearning the Colonial Cultures of Planning, Aldershot: Ashgate.
For more information about Dr Libby Porter, see her staff profile which includes a more comprehensive biography and list of her publications.